China

Event

Age of Empires: How the Qin and Han Dynasties Are Shaping China's Contemporary Identity

Speaker: Elizabeth C. Economy
Speaker: Howard French
Speaker: Mike Hearn
Speaker: Deborah M. Lehr
Presider: Joseph F. Kahn
Introductory Remarks: Richard N. Haass

The Council on Foreign Relations and the Metropolitan Museum of Art invite you and your guest to view the Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties exhibition, followed by a panel discussion on how these dynasties have informed contemporary Chinese art, politics, economics, and foreign policy.

See more in China; Culture and Foreign Policy

Op-Ed

Putting Pressure on China Probably Won’t Help U.S. Workers. Here’s What Might.

Author: Sebastian Mallaby
Washington Post

The U.S.-China relationship is one issue on which President Trump’s instincts are at least partly right — for China, let’s be honest, does not always play fair in international economic relations. It has limited respect for intellectual property; it subsidizes strategic industries with bargain loans and export credits; it uses government power over procurement to favor domestic firms.

See more in China; United States; Economics; Politics and Strategy

Article

Tillerson Bumbles Around Asia

Author: Ely Ratner
Politico

The Trump team’s early forays into Asia couldn’t have gone better. In early February, Defense Secretary James Mattis received high praise for his trip to Tokyo and Seoul, reassuring nervous allies that the Trump administration would continue decades of American leadership in Asia. A week later, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe braved a visit to the White House and was rewarded with President Donald Trump reaffirming the importance of the U.S.-Japan alliance.

See more in China; United States; Politics and Strategy

Article

Of Debt and Detriment

Authors: Benn Steil and Emma Smith
Weekly Standard

Benn Steil and Emma Smith show how China mirrors the U.S. “exorbitant privilege” from minting the world’s primary reserve currency. While the United States is deeply indebted to the rest of the world, it still earns far more abroad than it pays out. China, in contrast, has become the world’s largest creditor while paying foreigners far more than it receives. Steil and Smith argue that China is making itself vulnerable to financial crisis by massively subsidizing its geostrategic objectives.

See more in China; United States; Economics